Extending Range?

I’ve been wondering this for a while, what does RVR use to connect to a device? I’m guessing bluetooth, but it does not connect the same way as normal bluetooth. If it were bluetooth, then I could use a bluetooth amplifier/ transceiver to boost the range, but I’m not sure if that would work with the RVR. If anyone has any ideas on how to make this work, let me know.

Plus, here is a little photoshop I did today:

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Are you just looking for direct control with e.g. the EDU app?
Otherwise you can use a raspberry and turn that into a wifi hotspot so it creates its own wifi network. Then you can connect to that with a mobile device. wifi has a much longer range then bluetooth. And if needed you ran extend that with a small repeater that uses a 12v power input and power that with a powerbank that can provide 12v.

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I was thinking of using it with the manual driving option in the EDU app, or potentially the new RVR driving app. (not sure if that’s going to be a thing or not)

Also, is raspberry a seperate device?

Yes the raspberry pi is a separate device. It is essentially a mini computer running a debian OS variant. It can be connected and mounted on the RVR to do all kinds of stuff. Basically you can program a little brain for the RVR and let it do whatever you want. But that needs a little bit of coding knowledge too.

As for what kind of connection the EDU app uses I think it is bluetooth, but some of these apps also work by making first connection using bluetooth then switch over to a wifi connection.
Connect to the RVR and check if your mobile switched to another wifi, then you know if it is this kind of connection. If it doesn’t switch to another wifi then I guess it is purely bluetooth.

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If it is bluetooth, then how would I connect it with a bluetooth repeater? If it only connects via the app, and not in settings, then I would not be able to link it to the repeater if I correctly understand how they work.

RVR uses Bluetooth BLE to communicate. Not standard Bluetooth.

Mike

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Oh, thanks. So it’d be easier to just use Raspberry and learn how to code? :sweat_smile:

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Check out the official Raspberry Pi site www.raspberrypi.org to get started. In our testing the Pi Zero is a better option if you plan on using the RVR power supply to power the Pi. Otherwise, you could use a separate power bank stick it to the top along side the Pi if you wanted to use the Pi 4.

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@codingheroes Oh, I’ve already got hold of a Pi 3b. Right now all I need to do is find a monitor before I can start.

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I went looking for a small monitor at Best Buy but the price was higher than I wanted to spend. The sales guy suggested they had a small TV that was lower priced. It worked fine for working with my Up Board and then as a 3rd monitor on my desktop. So consider a small TV. Might find one cheap on local Facebook market place or Craig’s List.

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@rmerriam I have a old WIndows 7, which is loosing protection and service in 2020, so I’m thinking of hijacking that to use its screen as a monitor. (Since it will no longer be safe to use it normally.) I also know of lots of places, like thrift shops, with plenty of used screens. I’m sure I can find one, especially since tons of people will be upgrading theirs for christmas so there should be an abundance of unwanted monitors flying around.

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Has anyone tried using a standard 2.4GHz radio control for long range and a flight controller (F3 or F4 omnibus) from the RC world to drive the RVR? I would love to control the motors using a long range system just as a modern drone

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That’s actually what I would like to do as a first project. So if you get this going, it would be great to hear about it!

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I will try using various methods and post them if I have any advances, help from the community would be great

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I’m honestly not sure about how well bluetooth and controllers work together. While both drones and BLE work on the same 2.4GHz frequency, they are quite different. They are comparable to languages. German and english use the same letters, but that doesn’t mean you can understand both if you know one. Bluetooth is there to replace connections between devices, where 2.4GHz Wireless is for extending a local area network.

Overall, your best bet would be to possibly program a RasPi to work with the controllers, but that wouldn’t be too simple.

Source: Quora and many other sites.

I’m not exactly an expert in the field, so if you know of a way to make it work let me know, but from what I can find it doesn’t usually work.

Yes, I figured this is not easy and requires a lot of programming. I mainly use a RasPi and python for manipulating the RVR and based on your comment wouldn’t It be easier to set up a LoRa WAN and build a mechanical interface (like a remote control with sticks) than trying to make the programming from scratch?

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You can probably use the RVR console thread for ideas and possible code. Someone has already made a program enabling RVR to be driving over wifi with a computer. If you could just change the triggers used in the code to remote sticks instead of keys it shouldn’t be too hard to get it up and running. The only hard part would be making the code work with a controller. You might be able to hook the controller up to the computer of something.

I have code that does SBUS. So I can connect my RC receiver to my micro controller and receive 16 channels of data from my RC transmitter.

Need to build the code to convert the channel data into drive commands for the RVR though.

Mike

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Awesome! do you have it on Github? is it licensed? it would be awesome to see it working

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Not so fast. My code is for the Propeller chip and not the Raspberry Pi. I do see there are libraries available for the Pi though but they require some additional hardware.

So now you can control your Pi from a mile away. Throttle, Pitch, Roll, and Yaw are what you get but how do you turn that into movements for the RVR.

Mike

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